Tag Archives: investment

How to Invest with Interest Rates so Low

Posted February 23, 2012 by admin. tags:Tags: , ,
Jars of money

 

 

Written by Dave Young, President of Paragon Wealth Management

Usually it’s stock market investors that feel stressed.  Now, conservative investors are feeling the pinch too.

Life used to be simple.  You took your retirement savings and put it into a savings account, annuity or bank CD.  You didn’t earn much,  but you did get 4% or 5% and that was enough to make your retirement plan work.

Now things are not so easy.  Interest rates are the lowest ever.  Conservative savings options are paying between zero and one percent.  If you want to take a chance and tie your money up for ten years in a U.S. government Treasury Bond –  then you can get a whopping 1.9%!  Soon you may have to pay to put your money in a bank account.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like the situation is going to change anytime soon.  Ben Bernanke, Chairman of the Federal Reserve,  said  they will keep interest rates this low until sometime in 2014, three years from now.

So for the foreseeable future, conservative savers will watch their accounts decline in value, even if they don’t spend any of their money.  In 2011 the inflation rate was 3.2%.  If you were lucky and earned 1% interest on your CD –  then you lost 2.2% for the year.  Keep that constant for five years and your $100,000 in savings is worth only $89,000 in real terms.  It’s even worse if you pay taxes on the interest that you earned.  All in all…not a good plan for building wealth.

So, what are the alternatives? 

Option one: Stay ultra conservative and watch your savings go down in value each year.

Option two:  Take on a little more risk but clearly understand the risk you are taking in order to get higher returns.

It doesn’t make any sense to move from very low risk to very high risk.  Unfortunately many investors make this mistake.  If you decide to take more risk then you must be absolutely certain that you fully understand the amount of downside risk you are taking on.

For example, on a one to ten scale, as long as the bank doesn’t go broke, a bank  CD might have a risk level of two.  A bond might be a risk level of four.  A real estate project might have a risk of level of 6.  A gold purchase might be an 8.  An investment in your neighbors business might be a 10.

The point is that you need to clearly understand how much risk you are taking before you invest your money.  Sometimes, when investors become weary of getting 1% they throw in the towel and move over to something very aggressive that promises a 20% return.  Such rash behavior usually results in losing everything.

Not understanding the risk of a potential investment causes some investors to stay stuck in their low interest investments indefinitely.  They are afraid to make any changes because they aren’t sure how much risk they are taking.

On the other hand, not understanding risk properly sometimes causes investors to invest in very risky things that they should never consider.  That is why it is so important to fully understand the risk you are taking.

In order to get a better return an investor might consider moving from a one on the risk scale to a three.  Or maybe from a three to a five.  But it is foolish to move from a one on the risk scale to a seven or ten.

Recommendations

Many investors use our conservative Managed Income portfolio in order to generate income and control risk in this very difficult environment.   This conservative portfolio follows a strategy of moving between various conservative investments depending on market conditions.

It’s primary objective is to preserve principal.  Its secondary objective is to generate returns.

This conservative portfolio has returned an annual return of 6.03% compounded, net of fees, to investors from October 2001 through December 2011.  See www.paragonwealth.com for the full track record and disclosures.

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Watch Paragon’s video most recent video to learn more about how to avoid investment scams.

Disclaimer

Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. 

 

Why use Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs)?

Posted November 17, 2011 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , ,

Watch this short video to learn more about exchanged-traded funds. Dave Young, Paragon's President, and Nathan White, Paragon's Chief Investment Officer, discussed why they like to use them, why they are popular, the benefits of using them, and the problems with using them. They also cautioned investors when using them.

Disclaimer
Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Whither the Europeans…

Posted August 19, 2011 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , , ,
6a00e54fa07ce28833015390d4bb37970b-800wi


photo by lyng883

Written by Nathan White, Paragon’s Chief Investment Officer

During the financial crisis of 2008 to 2009, there were many Europeans who scoffed at our troubles and blamed us for dragging them down. How irresponsible we Americans were was the general tone. Oh the irony.

How’s that Greek investment feeling right now?

It felt good to get that off my chest…

With the markets continuing its record moves and volatility and testing the recent lows, what is next? In the short-term, the market is extremely oversold and sentiment is extremely negative. It can be very hazardous to sell into this condition. The bad news is that Europe is reeling and their banking system is under extreme strain. Their recent futile efforts such as banning all short selling and the proposal of financial transactions tax are extremely counterproductive. Their fractured political system makes it hard to organize a bailout like the U.S. engineered three years ago. At some point they will organize a bailout, but the questions is a matter of timing. Will it come after bank failures occur or before?

In the meantime the uncertainty is hammering the market and affecting the real economy.

It is normal at this stage of the economic cycle for growth to slow down after business catch up to a more “normal” level. The slowing economic data was exacerbated to the downside by the Japanese earthquake ramifications and then unfortunately coincided with the debt-deal circus in Washington. Now the great debate is whether all these developments are going to cause to a double-dip recession. Some leading indicators are telling as much and indeed the effects of the current events are going to have an economic impacts as they are somewhat self-fulfilling. However, whether we have another recession or not is a moot point with regards to the market as much of it has been priced in.

Washington is still MIA and the Fed seems to be out of bullets.

However, don’t count the Fed out as Bernake is not called “Helicopter Ben” for nothing and they could pull out new versions of QE3. Bailouts always help in the short-term, but retard the upside. If the Fed keeps expanding its balance sheet at some point in time it will have to be reversed and that is the risk I fear in the future. I wish the Fed would have been selling all their bonds into this recent rally for a tremendous profit!

In the background of all this is that corporate profits have been tremendous supporting a low valuation argument and corporate balance sheets are generally strong and flush with cash. If a recession ensues they are much better prepared than three years ago (including the banks).

No one stopped buying iPhones during the last recession.

Survival is a powerful instinct and as we enter an election year, policy makers could come to their senses and realize they need some “real” policies that encourage economic activity or they are history (note to President Obama – extending unemployment is not one of them).

In the short-term, and until we get some kind of clarity/resolution regarding the European debacle, it is going to be a tough and volatile environment. The up side risk is that if at any time we get some resolution of the Euro situation stocks are extremely undervalued and could rebound so fast that sellers would be left holding the bag.

In this environment, we are cautiously looking at the areas such as energy and materials that get beat up the most and then offer the best upside while at the same time holding some cash for a bit of protection and future opportunities. In both of our portfolios, we have raised just shy of 20 percent cash and as a precautionary move. We have moved out of all traditional money markets into U.S. Government money funds (or FDIC Bank- sweep features) in order to avoid the negative effects should the European banking system freeze up.

Disclaimer
Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Three Tips to Help You Rollover Your 401K

Posted September 23, 2010 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , , , ,
Happy couple with grandkids

Written by Dave Young, President of Paragon Wealth Management

If you are ready to rollover your 401K, chances are you are retiring. You have worked your entire life so that one day you could enjoy your retirement.

Like most retirees, you now want to spend time with family and friends, travel and do those things you’ve always been too busy to do.

Before you begin your worry-free retirement, you have a major decision to make. This is probably the most important post-retirement decision you will make. More than any other decision, this one directly affects your quality of life going forward.

Below are three tips to follow before you rollover your 401K.

1- Hire a professional. It is important to hire a professional to help you. When you file a lawsuit, you hire an attorney and when you need surgery, you go to a surgeon. You also need a professional when rolling over your 401K.

2- Get objective advice. Understand how you should be invested, how long the money will last, and how much money you will need for retirement.

3- Don’t procrastinate. By consolidating your 401K into an IRA, you better position yourself to keep your investment plans on track.

Be careful when making this decision, and weigh out all of your options. These three steps will help you make a decision that is right for you.

Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from other sources Paragon believes this to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Five lessons learned the past 12 months

Posted October 29, 2009 by admin. tags:Tags: , ,
Lessons learned


photo by mikebaird

Written by Dave Young, President of Paragon Wealth Management

“Buy and Hold” strategy doesn’t work.
The investment strategy that Wall Street and mutual fund companies constantly promote called “buy and hold,” has been a complete failure over the past 12 years. It has generated negative returns when adjusted for inflation.

Market forecasts by “experts” provide no benefit.
Most forecasters completely missed this decline. The majority also missed the recent rebound.

Set your risk tolerance level.
Setting your risk tolerance properly before investing is critical to success. You must be comfortable with the amount of volatility in your portfolio or you are likely panic and sell at the wrong time. Once again, hoards of investors bailed out at the market bottom and then missed the entire rally.

Expect the Unexpected.
When building your retirement plan, hope for the best but plan for the worst.

Follow a disciplined, proactive investment strategy.
Remove emotion from your investment process. In the investment world, decisions based on emotion are usually wrong.

Paragon Wealth Management
is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions.
Although the information included in this report has been obtained from
sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its
accuracy.  All opinions and estimates included in this report
constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to
change without notice.  This report is for informational purposes only
and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the
purchase or sale of any security.  Past performance is not a guarantee
of future results.

Should you invest based on what you hear in the media?

Posted October 5, 2009 by admin. tags:Tags: , ,

Below is a video interview with Dave Young, President and Founder of Paragon Wealth Management and Nathan White, Paragon’s Chief Investment Officer. They discussed their thoughts on investing based on what is said in the media.

Here are a few highlights:

Question:

Why shouldn’t you invest in the stock market based on what you hear in the media?

Answer:

Most
of what you see in the media is sensationalized. This creates a dangerous situation for investors because they will make decisions based on inaccurate information.

For example, last year as the economy weakened, it would have been
normal for the stock market to sell off. A normal sell off would have
been a decline of 25-30 percent. Instead, the market went into an
extreme sell off, losing 56 percent of its value. Much of that sell off
was driven by a media created frenzy coupled with political uncertainty.

Swine flu example:

Normally, each year, the flu kills about 30,000 Americans. Since
April, when this started, there have been only 550 American deaths.

The difference with the stock market…

-With swine flu you can convince yourself you are sick or might get sick, but you can’t make yourself die.
-With investments, when following the media, you can scare yourself silly and sell all of your investments.
-Selling at the wrong time kills your chance for long-term investment success.

Question:

If you can’t make investment decisions from what you see and hear in the media, then what can you use?

Answer:

It is important to follow a proven disciplined investment strategy that doesn’t follow emotion. At Paragon Wealth Management, we create customized investment strategies for every client. Each strategy follows this criteria:

  • Provides effective diversification
  • Works in different markets and time frames
  • Is flexible and stable
  • Fits clients’ personal needs and goals

 

Paragon Wealth Management
is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions.
Although the information included in this report has been obtained from
sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its
accuracy.  All opinions and estimates included in this report
constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to
change without notice.  This report is for informational purposes only
and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the
purchase or sale of any security.  Past performance is not a guarantee
of future results.

What Stimulus?

Posted February 19, 2009 by admin. tags:Tags: , , ,
Word Collage

Written by Dave Young
President of Paragon Wealth Management

photo by abraaten  

Investment markets represent psychology in motion.

In an effort to stay on the right side of that motion we are constantly evaluating all of the factors that affect investors. Those factors are many and varied but in include good and bad “news”, media spin, company announcements, economic data and most recently the “political” impact.

For the past six months we have had more political impact on the markets than any time I can remember.

I try to look at all political news objectively and evaluate it only on its market impact. Unfortunately, I think that both political parties often act in their own best interest rather than the people they represent.

The stock market sold off initially, through September, as a result of the credit, banking and real estate crisis. It was a fairly normal bear market at that point. Then, as the negative political rhetoric intensified and the media amplified it we saw extreme fears enter into the financial markets. As it became clear that Barack Obama was going to win the election, the markets sold off further in anticipation of the uncertainty created by a change of leadership. That market sell-off followed the pattern of previous election years when the incumbent party loses.

After the election, the market stabilized and there was an expectation that Obama would move from the left to the center. Also, there was an expectation that the media would begin to spin more positive news once their candidate of choice was in. Those would be positives for the market.

Unfortunately, the “stimulus” package that was recently passed changed those expectations. Prior to its passage Obama and company pledged CHANGE.

They promised transparency and bipartisanship. They promised a stimulus package to “jump start” the economy. This was advertised as “change we could believe in.”

With no time allowed to read or review the bill, it was jammed through congress for approval.

It’s hard for anyone to take a promise of transparency seriously when the bill is pushed through so quickly that it is not even allowed to be read.

Its passage re-defined the word “bi-partisan” when only three of the republicans (out of a total 219) voted in favor of the bill. The bi-partisanship promised was ignored and taken even more extreme and negative levels than the previous administration.

Based on its contents, the “stimulus” appears to be no more than an excuse to pass an extreme government entitlement spending package.

Unfortunately, only about 20% of this bill can be characterized as stimulative. Most taxpayers wouldn’t spend a dollar to get 20 cents of value. The market voiced its opinion with a drop in the Dow industrials of over 400 points since the stimulus bill passed.

The good news is that the market will recover eventually. In the past 100 years we’ve been through 34 bear markets, which were followed by bull markets.

The stock market and economy have always recovered in spite of… not because of the actions of politicians.

Don’t Listen to Market Forecasts

Posted February 4, 2009 by admin. tags:Tags: , , ,
Stock Market Forecasts

Written by Dave Young, President


photo by nieve44/laluz

At the beginning of the year, most investors are interested to hear a market forecast or a prediction of how the stock market will be throughout the year. The truth is no one can predict the future for the stock market or anything else and be absolutely 100% sure it will turn out that way.

There is no shortage of self-proclaimed market prophets. You can find them in investment magazines, newspapers or CNBC. Although they can be entertaining, they provide no real investment value. They do not help anyone make money. In fact, investors who follow them are more likely to lose money than to gain it.

The way the forecasting game works is that the market guru, seer, pundit or executive continually makes forecasts in an attempt to gain public attention. By sheer luck maybe half of these predictions are proven right-meaning that at least half of them are wrong. On the occasions when the forecast turns out to be correct, the forecaster plays it up.

Those many forecasts that don’t pan out (and those many investors who are financially hurt by them) are never spoken of again.

In truth, you’re more likely to get an accurate prediction of the future by listening to the weather forecasters. At least they inflict less damage when they’re wrong.

Yet despite mountains of data that show how ineffective the celebrity market forecasters are, they continue to make their predictions and many unfortunate people continue to base their financial decisions on shoddy, unproven advice.

Market professionals are not alone in their inability to forecast market behavior. Economists do just as poorly. Every six months the Wall Street Journal prints the results of a survey of leading economists who predict the level and direction of interest rates for the coming six months. 55 high profile economists currently participate in this semiannual forecast.

You’d think such prestigious economists in such a high profile newspaper would know what they’re talking about, right? Nope.

If they’d just blindly guessed they’d have a 50/50 chance, but their actual educated predictions turn out to be much worse. And these are the best the industry has to offer!

So if forecasts are a waste of time, then what does work?

I am convinced that investors will only succeed when they are able to remove emotion from the investment process. Gut feelings are not a reliable investment strategy– even the gut feelings of so-called experts.

Oftentimes, successful investing requires you to act in a way that is contrary to what you “feel” is right. For example, several of our models measure the overall optimism or pessimism in the investing public. When optimism is high we know that there’s a lot of risk in the market, and it’s likely that the market will decline. Likewise, when optimism is low and most investors think that things are really bad, that is usually a great time to invest. This pattern has repeated itself for years.

We take great care to ensure that all of our investment decisions are based on solid, proven models, not hunches. Our portfolio allocation models tell us how much we should be invested based on measured risk in the market. We run the models daily to determine the most effective percentages of investments and cash holdings.

Once we’re in the market, our portfolio focus models tell us where we should be invested. We constantly track all areas of the equity markets on both a macro scale (small cap, mild cap, large cap, value, growth, international and emerging markets) and a micro scale (individual industries, sectors and countries).

The bottom line for Paragon Wealth Management’s clients is that they can be confident that their portfolio isn’t being managed by some celebrity market fortune teller. Our quantitative models enable us to impartially measure what is actually happening in the market and how much risk there is at any point in time. We constantly evaluate the models to determine how effectively they are working. In my opinion, this is one of the best ways to invest for long term success.

To learn more about our investment strategies at Paragon Wealth Management, visit www.paragonwealth.com or call 801-375-2500.

Why I’m Not Panicking About the Stock Market – And You Shouldn’t, Either

Posted July 30, 2008 by admin. tags:Tags: , , ,
Jurassic Park photoshopped picture

 


Photo by highlander411

Article taken from the Simple Dollar Blog with permission
Written by Trent

Over the last three or four days, I’ve received a bunch of emails from readers asking me why I’m not talking breathlessly about the chaos at Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, and IndyMac. I’ve read dozens of long explanations of why this is disastrous and why it’s the worst thing people have ever seen, and I’ve read many, many people shouting that they should completely get out of all investments right now and put their cash in a little green box buried in their back yard (or some similar crazy scheme).

Here’s my take: I think there’s almost nothing to worry about, and if you’re actively selling any broad investments right now, you’re actually making a giant mistake.

Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t be panicking right now.

One: Panics happen every few years

Right now, we’re having panics in the banking and housing sectors. A few years ago, corporate accounting was destroying everything. Remember the tech sector collapse of half a decade ago? The savings and loan failures before that?

These booms and busts happen for one reason and one reason alone: most investors are sheep. They follow whatever has been hot lately, and they run away whenever there’s a bad sign. These processes are rarely rational – in the 1630s, people bet their entire life fortunes on tulips.

It took only a glance at housing prices over the last decade or so to see that there was a big bubble going on. This bubble turned out to be mixed in with the banking industry which was funding this bubble. Now we’re seeing that bubble collapse. In a few years, when all of those ARMs adjust, people will be running around yelling “PANIC” about some other sector.

Two: The talking heads shouting “PANIC!” make money from “PANIC!”

If you run out right now and sell your stock, guess who makes money? That’s right, brokers and fund managers. These people want churn. They want you to buy and sell so they can make profit on the buying and the selling. The people who are on CNBC and TheStreet.com shouting “PANIC!”

If I was a broker or an investment manager and I knew that if I shouted “PANIC!” I could make myself a mint, I’d be tempted to shout “PANIC!” I probably wouldn’t do that because it would actually not help my clients, but there are other philosophies out there. Some believe that alerting their clients to “PANIC!” can help them avoid losses. Others could actually care less about the clients and just want to profit.

There’s big money to be made in “PANIC!”

Three: Stocks are not short term investments

Unless you’re day trading (and thus making an effective career out of very short term movements), stock investments should never be short term investments. The stock market is extremely volatile over the short term – annual losses of 20% or more in stock investments are somewhat regular occurrences.

So why invest in stocks? Over the long run, the gains exceed the losses over the stock market as a whole. Here’s a quote from David Swenson, the author of the excellent book Unconventional Success:

To the extent that history provides a guide, the long-term returns for stocks encourage investors to own stocks. Jeremy Siegel’s two hundred years of data show U.S. stocks earning 8.3 percent per annum, while Roger Ibbotson’s seventy-eight years of data show stocks earning 10.4 percent per annum. No other asset class possesses such an impressive record of long-term performance.

The stock market returns very well on average. The only problem is that it’s an average of some very nice positive numbers and some very painful negative numbers – that’s the nature of an open market.

Why should one believe the stock market is going to go up in value? THIS IS THE END!
Stocks will continue to go up in value over the long term for one simple reason: worker productivity. Companies over time will earn more money per employee because each employee is able to produce more value. As long as humans are innovative creatures, coming up with new technologies and ideas, then companies that implement those ideas will increase in value.

Four: Down markets are never a time to sell

At some point, the stock market will return to its previous level – there has never been a twenty year period of loss in the overall stock market.

Since the stock market is down this year, and we believe that the stock market will eventually match the previous high, now is not the time to sell. Now is the time to buy.

Let’s look at it visually using the S&P 500 from about 2000 to about 2007:

Obviously, it’s great to sell at the top – you’ll make a killing. The problem is that one never knows exactly where the top is. The market will start to drift downward and many people will think it a normal fluctuation. After a while, the talking heads on CNBC and other financial papers will begin to notice that it’s going downward and start shouting “BEAR! BEAR!” to get people to “SELL! SELL!” so they can make a profit on transaction costs. Most people still don’t move right away – it takes a little while for the “panic” to build.

Eventually (as marked above), it becomes conventional wisdom that things are disastrous – that’s where we’re at now, well into the down trend. Now, if we believe that at some point in the future things will eventually return to their original level and we can clearly see that things are way down from their original level … why would you sell? Instead, it looks like a time to buy to me.

Five: If this event is making you worried about losing everything, then you’re not appropriately diversified.

My last point is for those people who have a ton of money in the damaged sectors right now. If you’re afraid that you’re going to be losing “everything” in this down situation, then the problem isn’t the stock market. It’s your investment strategy.

Diversification is what saves you from a bubble blowing up in a particular sector. Many advisors suggest having 5% of your total assets or less in any one sector simply to a void this. That way, even if one sector loses everything, you lose at most 5% of your money – a 20% drop in one sector means only an overall 1% loss for you.

In other words, don’t put all of your eggs in one basket and you won’t panic quite so much when a basket falls to the floor.

Throughout all of this tumult, I’ve lost a fair amount of money in my retirement account. Right now, I’m contributing significantly more money per week than I was three months ago. And I feel fine. I hope you do, too.

What is a Fiduciary Advisor?

Posted January 10, 2008 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Cartoon of a Judge

Written by:  Dave Young, President

In simple terms, a Fiduciary Advisor has a legal responsibility to put the client’s needs ahead of his or her own. There are a number of important differences that separate advisors who have fiduciary responsibilities from those that don’t.

Non-Fiduciary Advisors

It has been estimated that 90% of the people who fall into the category of financial advisors do not have any sort of fiduciary responsibility. They are also known as stockbrokers, insurance agents, or sales Representatives. They may hold various licenses, but since they are not fiduciaries they are often more interested in selling insurance and investment products than managing your portfolio.

Non-fiduciary advisors are compensated by commissions which are often the equivalent of years worth of management fees. And in the end, if you’re dissatisfied with your service, the only way to get out of the product is to pay a large surrender fee.

Titles for non-fiduciary advisors are unregulated, which means that these advisors don’t need to call themselves brokers or insurance agents, but can adopt titles like:  Advisors, Financial Consultants, or Financial Planners. They are not required to put investor interests head of their own, and as such as more interested in making “suitable” recommendations that involve selling a number of products.

These sales reps have limited disclosure requirements and are not allowed to have account discretion. And most of them receive a large commission upfront on the initial sale, which means they have very little incentive to continue helping the client.

Fiduciary Advisors

It has been estimated that only 15-20% of advisors have fiduciary responsibility, and are usually Registered Investment Advisors (RIA’s) or Investment Advisor Representatives. These advisors are registered with the SEC or the state security division (depending on their size).

These are acknowledged fiduciaries who provide ongoing financial advice and services. Compensation is on a quarter by quarter basis for continued services, and ends if the investor is dissatisfied and chooses to leave.

An advisor with fiduciary responsibilities is held to a higher ethical standard and should have the knowledge to provide sophisticated wealth management services and advice. RIA’s are licensed to provide ongoing financial advice, and fiduciary advisors are required to provide disclosure in their ADV’s.

The investor must always come first. At Paragon Wealth Management, we have a fiduciary responsibility to always put your needs ahead of our own, and live up to all of our responsibilities.

Copyright 2008 Paragon Wealth Management

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