Tag Archives: Federal Reserve

Investment Choices in a Low Rate World

Posted April 29, 2016 by paragon. tags:Tags: , , ,
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On March 29, Fed Chair Janet Yellen gave a speech to the Economic Club of New York. Before you fall asleep, as is usually justified when it comes to mind-numbingly boring economic talk, let’s discuss how her comments will directly affect your investments. Yellen advocated for letting the economy run hot before continuing to raise interest rates. She basically admitted that the small increase administered by the Fed in December was a mistake, and that global and market events have significant influence on policy. (You don’t say …)

So now that the expectation of “lower for longer” interest rates is all but set in stone, how will this affect your investments?

First and foremost, the yields offered on savings and money market-type accounts will remain paltry. It will be hard to find and earn a safe return. Simply put: If you want a return, you’re going to have to take on more risk. Taking on more risk exposes one to a higher degree of losses and volatility. (Ironically, this is exactly what investors looking for a “safe” return want to avoid.) The search for anything with yield has caused the prices of bonds and other income-yielding assets to rise dramatically in price.

Many investors seeking yield have turned to alternative assets such as junk bonds, MLPs, utility, telecom and other dividend stocks. Whereas these can be valid long-term investments, many are treating these assets as “bond proxies” while ignoring their stock-like risks. These alternatives do have better yields than many safe assets, but they are exposed to the gyrations of the stock market. It doesn’t take much of a drop in the equity market to wipe out the small yields these alternatives offer. Plus, they’re expensive, and these assets are sensitive to changes in rates. At today’s low rates, this risk has become even greater.

Because bond yields move inversely to bond prices, it is getting harder to squeeze price returns out of bonds as interest rates get lower. The closer rates get to zero, the more sensitive bond prices become to changes in rates. As bonds increase in price, their future returns are lowered. This is true even if rates go sideways from current levels.

To understand the current situation for a conservative asset and what it implies about future returns, refer to the displayed chart. This chart presents the historical interest rate (black line) and the total return (red line) for the 10-year U.S. Treasury bond since 1928. Interests rates peaked in 1981 as the Fed finally hiked rates dramatically to kill inflation that had hobbled the economy for an extended period. Notice the sharp increase in the total return line that corresponds with the long drop in interest rates since the peak in 1981. During this period, shaded in blue, bonds performed very well. Now review the area shaded in green, which displays a period of rising interest rates. The red total return line barely rises during this period, illustrating the poor performance of bonds during this 41-year period. The point of the chart is to compare where interest rates are now and what happened to future returns the last time they were at this level. At a current yield of around 1.75% for 10-year Treasury bonds, the future return of bonds does not look good.

The Fed and other central banks are putting on a full court press to get higher inflation. But what happens if they actually get what they want? Inflation is the No. 1 enemy of bonds because it erodes the future value of bonds’ interest payments and return of principal. Central banks must raise interest rates to offset the negative effect of inflation. As interest rates rise, the prices of bonds go down. The lower rates go, the less cushion (in the form of interest earned) there is to offset decline in bond prices that come with increases in interest rates. Not predicting rampant inflation, but even a return to “normal” inflation can significantly affect bonds at their current prices. That is at the heart of what makes the current environment so risky.

So, in this low-return environment, how will we generate returns in Managed Income? Fierce flexibility and continued commitment. We look at the risk first, and then compare it to the potential return. We are more opportunistic. We expertly use a combination of strategies to offset risks — and work endlessly for your best interests. One thing is certain: Our flexible strategy will be the best approach to this uncertain future.  Here are some current investment choices that we feel offer better return for the risk versus the average alternatives that many investors chasing high yield are opting for:

High Yield/Higher Risk

  • Long Maturity Bonds
  • High Yield (Junk) Bonds
  • High Dividend Stocks

 

Better Option

  • Short to Intermediate Corporate Bonds
  • Preferred Stocks
  • Some REITs and Closed-End Funds
  • Dividend Growth Stocks

 

Disclaimer Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Update on Recent Federal Reserve Announcement

Posted September 21, 2015 by paragon. tags:Tags: ,
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Written By Nathan White, Chief Investment Officer

There was quite a bit of anxiety leading up to last week’s decision by the Federal Reserve on whether or not we would get the first interest rate increase in over nine years.  Surprisingly citing overseas uncertainty, they decided upon no change and slightly lowered their forecast for the path of future rate increases. There are very heated debates about the pros and cons of continuing the current Zero Interest Rate Policy (ZIRP) and many valid points being made by both sides.  The Fed “officially” introduced more uncertainty last week by openly using overseas (i.e. China) volatility and weakness as the reason for continuing with zero interest rates despite the decent progress of the U.S. economy. While I understand the Fed’s reasoning and with inflation so low they can be justified in not raising rates yet, but it seems each time they get closer they trot out a new reason (justified or not) for holding off.

However, I believe this is now starting to create too much uncertainty and mixed signals which begs the question of when will the time ever be right to move off the zero bound?  The Fed is indeed trapped at this point as monetary policy has done about all it can and the longer it has to keep rates at zero is more indicative of a general economic malaise.  I do however think the economy is strong enough to raise rates a bit and it would actually help free up frozen capital, aide savers, and restore the healthy discipline of normal price signals.  Overly easy monetary policy basically steals from the future in that it pulls demand forward leaving us with less economic growth in the future when it has to get paid for. The current monetary policy is still commensurate with an economy in crisis and we are well away from that condition. The longer the Fed has to stay a zero or delays raising rates runs the risk of never getting out or moving dramatically in order to play catch up.  Both of those scenarios are not good.

OK, enough of my diatribe….What are our current plans and actions?

The net takeaway from last week’s decision was that we did not learn anything that would want to make us take more risk at the current time.  Our models are still telling us to be cautious at this point.  The speed of the August decline did create a short-term oversold condition, but we were ready ahead of that.  We do not see a recession in the cards at the current time, but the markets are still trying to adjust to new dynamics (i.e. slowing profit growth, emerging market risk, effects of reversing the Fed’s easy money policy, etc.). That can give us the opportunity to get assets at cheaper prices.  So for now we would sell some if we rally back towards the pre-August levels and buy some on dips toward the lows.  The cash we are holding in the portfolios gives us the flexibility and protection to take advantage of the current environment.

For those so inclined here’s a great take on the Fed’s move in the WSJ: http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-federal-reserve-pulls-a-lucy-1442531250

Disclaimer Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

 

 

Change, Currency & Caution

Posted May 12, 2015 by paragon. tags:Tags: , , , , , ,
Changes Ahead

Noteworthy changes are affecting the economy and markets. The stronger dollar and the sharp drop in energy prices are impacting economic growth, corporate profits, and investment strategies.

DOLLARS AND CHANGE

The rising dollar hurts U.S. companies dependent on foreign earnings or on rising commodity prices. After a long streak of healthy employment gains, the jobs report on April 3 came in surprisingly weak — at about half of what was expected. Credit conditions — as monitored by the NACM’s Credit Managers’ Index — have experienced widespread deterioration with the first back-to-back declines since 2008. While we are not forecasting a recession, the near-term risks to the economy and markets have increased. For the first time since the financial crisis, S&P 500 profits over the next two quarters are set to drop on a year-over-year basis. In fact, many analysts are now estimating flat or slightly negative earnings growth for the year. With market valuations around the high side (at 19 times trailing earnings), it can be harder for equities to advance without earnings growth.

RATES ARE LOW AND SLOW

Another headwind with regards to earnings and market valuations is the coming interest rate increases — or “normalization” of monetary policy. The Fed still seems to be looking for any reason to make this process slow and gradual. Forecasts for the first rate increase have now been pushed to September from June, and the path of rate increases looks to be much shallower than previously estimated. As I’ve said in the past, the Fed will be very reticent to normalize policy, which could pose significant risks down the road at the expense of marginal gains in the present. Still, a slight increase in rates can make it harder for valuations to expand from already elevated levels. Adjustments to higher rates are actually healthy, as it lets the market and fundamentals align back together, ensuring a healthier market long term. The stronger dollar effectively tightens monetary policy and has thus given the Fed a pass on raising rates in the next few months. Stocks are cheap relative to bonds, but at these low yields that doesn’t mean as much.

THE VULNERABILITY FACTOR

On the sentiment side, the indicators are slightly negative. Margin debt is at a record high, and hedge fund managers are holding the highest positions in U.S. stocks since the financial crisis. We have also seen deterioration in market breadth back into a neutral zone, which could indicate that the market advance is a bit tired. These factors, along with the aforementioned risks, make equities look vulnerable, as many of these elements may not be fully priced into the market. This increases the likelihood of a long overdue correction in stocks. The last major correction was in the fall of 2011.

GROWING PAINS AND GAINS

Any correction would be an opportunity within the context of a continuing bull market. A continuation of weaker economic indicators would make us rethink this assumption, but for now the evidence indicates that any slowdown would be temporary. Even though there are some near-term headwinds, the economy is still set to grow and can benefit overall from lower energy prices and still low interest rates. The shape of the yield curve, which has been an effective predictor of stock market declines and recessions, is still moderately bullish. While the dollar could continue to strengthen, the majority of the move has already occurred. Once the markets and economy adjust, we should see moderate economic growth continue.

FLEXIBLE FUTURE

Now is a time for good risk management practices that will enable flexibility in upcoming opportunities. Managed Income has been in protection mode for some time now, and our current positioning will pay off as the year progresses. Many assets in the yield arena are becoming increasingly stretched and now contain too much risk. At this point, it is more advantageous to wait for better prices before owning many of these “safe” assets. Not being in Treasuries has been a drag on performance for Managed Income. Volatility has dramatically increased at these low rate levels and ahead of the projected rate increases by the Fed. While helping to protect the portfolio against an equity or bond market drop, our small hedge positions have also been a drag on performance. However, our reasons for holding the hedges have not changed. The price paid to buy this insurance is still worth the cost.

PROCEED WITH CAUTION

Our current strategy is caution. We have been repositioning our portfolios to reflect a more cautious approach and to take advantage of better, developing opportunities. The energy sector is a tug of war between short-term oversupply and a balancing out that is just over the horizon (as U.S. production finally starts to decline). Oil price is still a question of how long rather than how low — it’s a question of which companies will be able to endure. Current estimates are all over the map, and it will take time for the market to sort it out. New lows for oil prices would be an opportunity to add to investments in this area. Conversely, we also like areas such as consumer discretionary and retail that benefit from lower energy prices and a stronger dollar.

With regards to emerging markets, we are opportunistic. The headwinds faced by a stronger dollar could subside but still remain a stumbling block for many countries. Overall, emerging Asia still looks relatively better than other emerging markets. But we view the better prospects such as China and India as trading plays currently. Europe could get a boost from the ECB’s actions and economic growth could finally be turning up. The fly in the proverbial European ointment is still Greece. It now looks inevitable that Greece will have to leave the Euro. They simply have too much debt and not enough productivity to pay it off — no matter how much the debt gets restructured. It has been widely reported that they will run out of money (again!) and whenever the Germans decide to cut their losses the break will occur. When that happens, it will cause market disruption and uncertainty due to possible contagion effects. This would present a buying opportunity in the Euro and European equities. Again, retaining flexibility in portfolios is crucial to taking advantage of the volatility that could arise as the market adjusts to this new environment.

Written by Nathan White, Chief Investment Officer

Disclaimer Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Adjustment Period

Posted October 22, 2014 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , , , , ,
Rolling hills and fall colors

The era of QE has been a difficult environment for active managers. The last five years have been a heyday for the passive investor, aided directly and indirectly by the Fed’s Quantitative Easing (QE) programs, stocks and bonds have moved up in an indiscriminate manner. All one had to do was simply show up. Bonds have been directly aided by the trillions the Fed has purchased while equities have indirectly benefitted from the implied “put” or backstop inferred by these Fed actions. The Fed’s actions to keep rates artificially low have created market distortions that have interfered with many of our quantitative indicators.

When all equities or bonds generally get rewarded the same regardless of their quality or differences, it’s hard for the skilled manager to outperform. A rising tide of liquidity has lifted all boats making it easy for anyone to navigate in the harbor. But once the tide starts to recede, experience and skill are what matters. We have seen improvement with our models over the last year coinciding with the gradual reduction of QE. As markets return to “normal” we are better able to assess the risk and rewards of certain moves and strategies. We are seeing a number of opportunities develop that haven’t been available for years.

In the short run the market is looking tired. We have rejected the doom and gloom scenarios that have been so prevalent since the financial crisis and have caused many investors to miss out on the bull market. However, fewer stocks are hitting new highs and the breadth has been getting weaker. The uncertainty surrounding the end of QE and the timing of rate increases next year are factors contributing to the hesitancy. This is only natural and healthy in the long-run. As previously mentioned it also creates opportunities for us that have not been available for the last four years. Over the last few years we have held a cash position which has been a drag on performance. Going forward, this cash position is an advantage as it helps to cushion the downside and provide flexibility to take advantage of opportunities provided by any volatility and uncertainty.

Although the risks have risen, this doesn’t mean investors should get out completely. The market has been overdue for a correction for some time but it doesn’t mean that everything is ready to fall apart. Getting completely out now could cause you to miss crucial gains if stocks continue to rally as they have. The last four years have shown the futility of trying to time the market in an all in or out manner. It is still a bull market until proven otherwise.

The current economic data has been stronger indicating that the economic growth is picking up instead of getting weaker. Ultimately that is a good sign as it will support earnings growth that has been the key foundation for the current bull market. Any correction that comes will probably be more short-term and establish the next leg up for the market. Therefore, a correction would be viewed by us as an opportunity rather than a harbinger of doom. It is only natural after five years of market advances and ahead of interest rates starting to move up to get some market hesitancy or disruption. Our current exposures are to technology, energy, and materials which are late-cycle stocks and tend to do well in rising rate environments. We also continue to favor various segments of the healthcare sector such as medical device and healthcare providers. Several emerging market opportunities are also looking more promising than in the past and we have started to act in a few of these areas such as Mexico and Brazil.

It is no secret that we have been cautious on the bond market for some time. As the sun sets on QE the angst over when the Fed will begin to raise rates and by how much is growing. Markets always like to price actions in ahead of time and right now it seems the equity market is being affected to some degree by this interest rate uncertainty. However, the bond market has not moved much yet. Many thought that bonds would have a difficult year as they began to price in rate increases. So far, bonds have done the opposite and surprised many by having a good year. The inevitable is coming though and the window for bond gains is closing as we creep toward June of next year which is the most accepted time for rate increase to begin. Any equity market weakness will give bonds more time to put off the reckoning.

Although the potential for a bloodbath in the bond market is high, that doesn’t mean it will happen. It will probably be more like death by a thousand cuts. The Fed will be very slow and steady in raising rates as to minimize market disruption. After all, they do hold about $4.5 trillion of bonds!  Even if interest rates rise in a slow and gradual manner (which is what I believe will happen) bonds will still produce negative or flat real returns at best.

For example, take a look at the interest rate sensitivity of a broad composite of investment grade bonds such as the Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index. If interest rates are a half to one percent higher a year from now, the index could be down 2.5 to over 5 percent respectively. The current yield of about two percent would still not offset the losses.

In preparation we have been making changes and getting ready for the coming environment. We have been early on this call which has caused us to underperform in Managed Income this year so far, but not by a lot and we are better positioned for what is to come. We believe this approach is the most effective from a risk/reward standpoint and will pay off in the environment to come. Now is the time to take a look at the risk in bond or fixed income holdings and make adjustments. The first one to two percent moves from the bottom will be the most painful.

Written by Nate White, Chief Investment Officer of Paragon Wealth Management

Disclaimer
Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

How Can Conservative Investors Survive in this Low Interest Environment?

Posted March 29, 2012 by admin. tags:Tags: , ,
Piggy Bank

Paragon Wealth Management advised conservative investors to think twice when investing in CDs or money market funds.

“Investors who save money in CDs and money market funds don’t have a lot of options right now,” said Dave Young, president and founder of Paragon Wealth Management. “With inflation rates at 3 to 4 percent and interest rates between 0.5 and 1.9 percent, savers are actually losing money in their “conservative” accounts.”

Ben Bernanke, chairman of the Federal Reserve, said they’ll keep interest rates this low until sometime in 2014.

“Savers can either stay ultra conservative, and watch their savings go down each year or take a little more risk in order to get higher returns,” said Young. “On a one to ten risk scale, with ten being the most risky, I believe that many investors would benefit by slightly moving up the risk scale.  If they move from a level of one to a three or a level of three to five they could potentially, significantly increase their earnings.

Young said, “On the other hand, investors shouldn’t jump from very low to very high risk.  That is usually when you see problems. Sometimes investors get tired of earning one percent, so they quit and move over into something extremely aggressive that promises a 20 percent return. He cautioned investors not to get extremely aggressive and invest in things they don’t understand, because that is often when they lose everything.”

“It is important for investors to determine their asset allocation based on their individual risk tolerance,” said Young. “This will help them stay invested over the long-term and optimize their investment choices.”

Making sure your portfolio is structured properly is more important than ever with interest  rates this low.

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Watch this video to learn more about how to invest when interest rates are low.

Disclaimer
Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Savers Beware (Continued)

Posted July 14, 2011 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , ,
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Written by Nathan White, Paragon’s Chief Investment Officer
Taken from Paragon’s 2Qtr 2011 print newsletter 

Debt Ceiling Debate

As July unfolds, the debt ceiling debate will take center stage. The current fiscal path in unsustainable, and we will someday experience the Greek tragedy now unfolding if we fail to enact any reforms. The main reason why the current recovery has been so sluggish is due to the continued debt overhang. It will act as a drag on the economy until the bad loans and debt are mostly cleared out. The problem with enacting reforms is that it is not politically popular because no one ever wants their benefits cut (that’s why the Greeks are rioting).

The markets always like to be bailed out in the short-term to avoid pain and hard decisions, similar to how we might react with our personal choices. The government is always willing to reinforce this behavior out of political panic and opportunity. The average interest rate on Treasury borrowing is 2.5 percent. If rates were to normalize up from the Fed’s artificial level, it would add hundreds of billions to the annual interest expense putting more pressure on the deficit.

The President’s budget predicts over four percent GDP growth every year for the next three years. These growth figures are so overly optimistic and out of line with general consensus, they are laughable.   Missing these rosy economic projections by even a percentage point with the President’s proposed budget would add trillions to the national debt in just a few short years thereby exacerbating our debt situation.

We are at an interesting crossroads where irony abounds. The healthiest situation for fiscal soundness is to enact reform now before it gets out of hand, but because it is not a problem now and requires some (very mild) short-term pain (i.e., entitlement reforms/cuts) there is not a great will to do so. In the short-term the bond market would like the debt ceiling raised to avoid any disruptions in payments of principal or interest. However, to continue to raise the debt ceiling without any real fiscal reforms will spell disaster for the bond market in the long-term.

Picking Savers’ Pockets

If the government does not like to make outwardly hard decisions, how can they tackle the enormous deficit and debt overhangs? This is where you come in. The government does not need to tax you more outright or cut your benefits – that would be to obvious and politically unfeasible. According to economist Carmen Reinhart of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, the option then becomes what is called financial repression. Financial repression involves keeping nominal (i.e. published or quoted) interest on government bonds lower than inflation. It is basically a form of picking the pockets of savers, and it is already happening.

The Consumer Price Index as of the end of May was running at 3.6 percent. I am sure you are well aware of the rate you get on savings, which is pretty much zero. This means that your cash just sitting around or at the bank is worth 3.6 percent less than a year ago.  This spread directly benefits the government at your expense. It inflates away the value of the debt. This type of action for 10 years could reduce the Debt/GDP level by 30 -40 percent! Voila, it’s like magic! They just stealthily increased your tax burden without you directly noticing. You will feel it over time in the form of a lower standard of living where things just never really seem to get to where they were before.

Although economic growth is slowing, it is still growth, and corporate profits are still very impressive providing support for further equity gains. All Congress and the President have to do is pass real fiscal reform along with the short-term debt ceiling increase, and the markets would smile.

Disclaimer
Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.  

Savers Beware

Posted July 8, 2011 by admin. tags:Tags: , , , ,
The Fed Building

 photo by cliff1066

Written by Nathan White, Paragon’s Chief Investment Officer
Taken from Paragon’s 2Qtr 2011 print newsletter  

Bond market yields are lower now than when the government was running a surplus a decade ago. Something is wrong with this picture. If you didn’t know otherwise, the low yields might lead you to believe that our national debt is low and sustainable. Further, just looking at the current yields,  you might think that our future budgetary concerns have been resolved due to significant entitlement reform.

THE FEDERAL RESERVE’S INVOLVEMENT

If real reform has not happened, then why hasn’t the bond market called the government’s bluff and reacted negatively to the prospect of future insolvency?

Part of the answer is in the question – future. Currently, everything is working. There is no crisis, and so he market is behaving as such. The government has a habit of only dealing with problems when they become crises. On the other hand, maybe the reason the bond market has not signaled caution is because a rather large participant (and that’s putting it mildly), namely the Federal Reserve, has been buying pretty much all of the debt. A government entity is buying government debt thereby expanding its already massive balance sheet.

I don’t care how you spin it, but something is not right with that picture. 

The Federal Reserve’s second round of quantitative easing ended in June. Ironnically, the ramifications of the program ending, along with a slowdown in economic growth, continued Eurozone soverign debt worries, and the U.S. debt ceiling fight, have caused people to flock to the safety of Treasuries sending yields back down to historic lows.

The Fed plans to continue maintaining its balance sheet by reinvesting principal and interest in an attempt to provide support for the anemic recovery. At this point, all further actions by the Fed produce lower marginal gains for the risks taken. The Fed is in no hurry to reduce its massive balance sheet, and it looks like it will not raise rates until well into 2012 and possibly 2013. I don’t believe the Fed will act until unemployment is significantly lower.

What will they do if the market forces them to act?

The real test of the Fed comes when they need to tighten monetary policy, but the economic and political climate are placing heavy pressure against such a move.

Volcker faced this climate in the late 70’s and early 80’s when inflation was soaring, and he had the guts to make the right move. This caused short-term pain, but long-term prosperity. Will the current Fed do the same when its time comes?

Who will fill the void now that the biggest buyer of new government debt is gone? Will foreigners continue to step up to the plate along with banks and the public? If market participants start to perceive that the U.S. obligations are nearing the tipping point, you will see rates rising ahead of Fed action.

If and when this unfolds is difficult to assess. It could be in a month, a year, five or 20 years from now. 

To be continued next week…

Disclaimer
Paragon Wealth Management is a provider of managed portfolios for individuals and institutions. Although the information included in this report has been obtained from sources Paragon believes to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy. All opinions and estimates included in this report constitute the judgment as of the dates indicated and are subject to change without notice. This report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any security. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.  

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